Categories
History Politics

Festa della liberazione

Today, 25th April, is Liberation day in Italy. This annual celebration marks the liberation of Italy from the forces of Mussolini’s Fascists and Hitler’s Nazis.

Following from Wikipedia Liberation Day (Italy) (click any links in this blog post for interesting reading):

The date was chosen by convention, as it was the day of the year 1945 when the National Liberation Committee of Upper Italy (CLNAI) officially proclaimed the insurgency in a radio announcement, propounding the seizure of power by the CLNAI and proclaiming the death sentence for all fascist leaders (including Benito Mussolini, who was shot three days later.

By 1 May, all of northern Italy was liberated, including Bologna (21 April), Genoa (23 April), Milan (25 April), Turin [2] and Venice (28 April). The liberation put an end to twenty-three years of fascist dictatorship and five years of war. It symbolically represents the beginning of the historical journey which led to the referendum of 2 June 1946, when Italians opted for the end of the monarchy and the creation of the Italian Republic, which was followed by the adoption of the Constitution of the Republic in 1948.

Mussolini and his mistress Clara Petacci. Artwork (surprisingly) by comic actor Jim Carrey
Monument to fallen partisans, Bologna
Italian communist party Liberation Day poster

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Categories
Literature Politics

Chernyshevsky, What Is to Be Done? – Bureaucratic bungling

The extraordinary circumstances surrounding the publication (and circumvention of censorship) of a landmark in 19th century subversive Russian literature.

In late 1862 Chernyshevsky asked the prison commandant for permission to begin work on a novel. His request granted, he set to work and produced the entire novel within four months, between December 14, 1862, and April 4, 1863. The first part of the manuscript was then submitted to the prison censor, who, whether carelessly or for devious purposes, passed it and forwarded the manuscript to the censor of the journal Sovremennik. Passed again, the novel was sent to the journal’s editor, Nekrasov, who promptly lost it in a cab. He managed to recover the manuscript only after advertising in the official gazette of the St. Petersburg police. With what is perhaps the greatest irony of Russian letters, the novel that the police helped to retrieve turned out to be the most subversive and revolutionary work of nineteenth-century Russian literature. Its publication has aptly been called “the most spectacular example of bureaucratic bungling in the cultural realm during the reign of Alexander II.”

Chernyshevsky, What Is to Be Done? and the Russian Intelligentsia,
Michael R. Katz and William G. Wagner

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Categories
Visual

It’s everybody’s god

A village road in Kerala, India
James Joyce, Ulysses
Sonic Youth & Pavement
Apologies to the artist, I was sure I made a note of who it was but now I can’t find it. I find it beautiful though.
David Berman, Actual Air

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Categories
Visual

David Berman, Existential Comics, Communism & Windows 3.1

Found this fascinating, like something David Berman might actually publish as a poem in it’s own right
Okay then….
Beautiful Soviet Union produced edition.
Nice

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